Mumps outbreak in Long Island likely caused by vaccine-resistant virus; majority of those affected were immunized

Long Beach has been hit with a mumps outbreak that is vaccine-resistant. According to health officials in the Long Island town, almost two dozen individuals are believed to have contracted the virus, with four confirmed cases and at least 14 suspected ones.

All of the cases involve people in their 20s, and the outbreak is being attributed to a new vaccine-resistant strain of the virus. In fact, most of those who have contracted mumps in this case have been vaccinated against it. Despite this, officials are actually urging people who have been in contact with those who are infected to get a mumps booster shot! If this strain of the virus is vaccine-resistant, and those who have been vaccinated are getting it anyway, why should people get yet another vaccine?

It’s also worth noting that none of the people currently affected are seriously ill. The symptoms of mumps tend to be mild, and include swollen cheeks, a headache, body aches and low-grade fever. There is no treatment, and it usually clears up on its own in just a few days.

Mumps is, however, highly contagious. It can be transmitted through the transfer of saliva, sneezing or coughing. As beach season continues in full swing, some Long Beach restaurants are even supplying diners with plastic cups as a means of stemming the outbreak. People who have symptoms of the illness are being advised to stay home for five days to avoid spreading it.

Controversy over mumps component of MMR vaccine

As some Natural News readers may recall, two Merck scientists filed a False Claims Act complaint back in 2010 saying that the Big Pharma firm knowingly falsified mumps vaccine data in order to come up with an efficacy rate of 95 percent. They achieved this by spiking the blood test involved with antibodies taken from animals.

This not only allowed them to earn hundreds of millions of dollars from the U.S. government, but also helped them crush the competition and monopolize the vaccine market.

The complainants said that Merck never tested the vaccine against actual mumps viruses out in the real world, and alleged that senior management was aware of this and allowed it to happen. That’s why it’s so important to seek out studies that are free from industry collusion.

Mumps outbreaks becoming fairly common among the vaccinated

Mumps outbreaks seem to be occurring a lot lately. Earlier this year, for example, the illness broke out at Harvard and a handful of other Boston colleges. More than three quarters of those afflicted had been vaccinated.

Dozens of university students in Illinois came down with mumps last year, despite the majority of them having previously been administered two rounds of the MMR vaccine. Do you spot a trend here?

It’s important to note that not only does the MMR vaccine not actually prevent mumps, but it might actually be responsible for spreading it. That’s because the injection contains a weakened version of the live virus, which causes an infection in the body. It can then be “shed” to other people, such as those who have not been vaccinated, or those who have compromised immune systems. That’s why it makes absolutely no sense that authorities are urging people who have been exposed to get yet another vaccine.

Of course, there are other reasons people might want to avoid the vaccine besides the fact that it doesn’t protect against mumps. The MMR vaccine has been linked to a number of harmful effects, including neurological damage, autism, developmental delays, seizure disorders, asthma and autoimmune dysfunction, to name just a few.

Sources include:

NBCNewYork.com

NaturalNews.com

NewYork.CBSLocal.com

NaturalNews.com

NaturalNews.com

Science.NaturalNews.com

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